Posts Tagged ‘project management’

Deal Of The Year

Hot off the presses, I just received a Groupon offer to take a $99 online Scrum Master certification course. Holy crap! Instead of paying $2000 and taking 3 consecutive days off from work, I can learn how to become a micro-managing process enforcer from the comfort of my own home; munching on chips while lounging around in my skivvies.

Online CSM

How can I refuse such a great deal? Just look at all those smart, well-dressed, professional, micro-managers in the advertisement staring at a burndown chart. It’s an especially nice touch that the marketing team put a pair of eyeglasses in Katherine Heigl’s hand.

From the course description:

CSMs understand Scrum values, practices, and applications and provide a level of knowledge and expertise above and beyond that of typical project managers.

If you’re a “typical project manager“, your days are numbered. The sky is falling and all that uncool PMI and EVM training you suffered through is sooooo yesterday.

course advisor

Categories: management Tags: , ,

Satirical Substitution

June 19, 2015 5 comments

A No Go For Me

June 13, 2015 2 comments

It’s All About That Jell

Agile, Traditional, Lean, Burndown Charts, Kanban Boards, Earned Value Management Metrics, Code Coverage, Static Code Analysis, Coaches, Consultants, Daily Standup Meetings, Weekly Sit Down Meetings, Periodic Program/Project Reviews. All the shit managers obsess over doesn’t matter. It’s all about that Jell, ’bout that jell, ’bout that jell.




All About The Jell


First, we have VCID:


In VCID mode, we iteratively define, at a coarse level of granularity, what the Domain-Specific Architecture (DSA) is and what the revenue-generating portfolio of Apps that we’ll be developing are.

Next up, we have ACID:


In ACID mode, we’ll iteratively define, at at finer level of detail, what each of our Apps will do for our customers and the components that will comprise each App.

Then, we have SCID, where we iteratively cut real App & DSA code and implement per-App stories/use cases/functions:


But STOP! Unlike the previous paragraphs imply, the “CID”s shouldn’t be managed as a sequential, three step, waterfall execution from the abstract world of concepts to the real world of concrete code. If so, your work is perhaps doomed. The CIDs should inform each other. When work in one CID exposes an error(s) in another CID, a transition into the flawed CID state should be executed to repair the error(s).


Managed correctly, your product development system becomes a dynamically executing, inter-coupled, set of operating states with error-correcting feedback loops that steer the system toward its goal of providing value to your customers and profits to your coffers.

CID Timeline


January 14, 2015 Leave a comment

Even though hard-core agilistas (since every cause requires an evil enemy) present it as thus:

agile fight

For large, complex, multi-disciplined, product developments, it should be as thus:

agile plus traditional

The Trees And The Forest

November 3, 2014 Leave a comment

As a result of an online Twitter exchange with Mr. Jon Quigley, I was able to purchase a copy of his and Kim Pries’s book, “Project Management Of Complex And Embedded Systems“. In exchange for a half-price deal, I promised to blog a review of the book and, thus, this is it.

quigley book

As indicated by the book title, the subject matter is all about the methods and tools commonly used by program/project managers for orchestrating large, capital-intensive, multi-disciplined, product development endeavors. Specifically, the content focuses on how the automotive industry successfully manages the development and production of products composed of thousands of electro-mechanical parts and hundreds of networked processors, some of which run safety-critical software. Even though we tend to take them for granted, when you think about it, an automobile is an extremely complex distributed system requiring lots of coordinated mental, physical, and automated, labor to produce.

The book provides comprehensive, yet introductory, coverage of the myriad of tools and processes used in the world of big project management. It’s more of a broad, sweeping, reference book than a detailed step-by-step prescription for executing a specific set of processes. It’s jam packed with lots of useful lists, figures, tables, and graphs. The end of each chapter even includes a specific “war story” experienced by one or both of the authors over their long careers.

As a long time software developer of complex embedded systems in the aerospace and defense industry, much of the book’s subject matter is familiar to me. RFPs, SOWs, WBSs, EVM, BOMs, V&V, SRRs, PDRs, CDRs, TRRs, FMEA, staged-gate phases, prime-subcontractor relationships, master schedules, multi-level approvals, quality metrics, docu-centric information exchanges, etc, are amongst the methods used to facilitate, focus, constrain, and guide end-to-end system development. Many of the chapter-ending war stories tickled my funny bone too!

For the types of projects Mssrs. Pries and Quigley target in the book, kicking off a project at sprint 0 with a self-organizing team of eight cross-functional developers and a primed product backlog of user stories just doesn’t cut it. So, if you’re a young, naive, cloistered software developer or scrum master or product owner who belittles all “traditional“, rigorous, non-agile processes, I highly recommend this book. It will give you a glimpse into a whole different world and broaden your horizons – perhaps allowing you to see both the trees and the forest.


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