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Posts Tagged ‘software development’

Three Forms Of Evaluation

December 17, 2014 Leave a comment

When creating an architecture or detailed design of a system component, up to three forms of design evaluation can be performed:

  • A: Continuous evaluation by the designer during the process
  • B: Evaluation by a peer group at one or more review events during the process
  • C: Evaluation by an expert outsider group after A and B

These three forms of evaluation are illustrated in the sequence of diagrams below. Note that as each evaluation type is progressively added to the mix, a new feedback loop is introduced into the system.

During A, the conceive/evaluate/repair loop is performed at the speed of thought within the isolated mind of the designer. As the designer applies his skills to his understanding of the problem to be solved, alternative component structures and configurations can pop up instantaneously during each of many high frequency loop traversals. At some point, the designer concludes that his design solution is stable enough for external scrutiny and/or ready for the next step of realization.

Designer Eval

During B, the designer walks through his creation in front of a group of peers. He explains the structure and behavior mechanisms of his design and how it solves the problem. If the peer group is qualified, prepared, and objective (QPO), at least a portion of the feedback the group produces will be valuable to the designer and he will use it to improve his design. However, unless all three QPO pre-conditions are satisfied, the peer review process will be a huge waste of time and money.

Peer Eval

Jetting in an expert outsider group is the riskiest type of evaluation. Assuming that the QPO criteria is satisfied, the fact that the expert outsider group has no real “skin in the game” after it vacates the premises should be a cause for concern to anyone contemplating the use of the technique.

Expert Eval

In general, the more negative feedback loops incorporated into a process, the more likely the process is to produce its intended output. As the final figure above implies, incorporating all three types of evaluation into a design review process can lead to a high quality design. However, blindly ignoring the QPO criteria and/or failing to address the “skin in the game” risk can increase cost, lengthen schedule, and lay waste to your well-intentioned review process – without you ever knowing that it occurred. As ever, the devil is in the details.

Show Me Your Curves

December 14, 2014 7 comments

Either directly or subliminally, the message I hear from hardcore agilista big-wigs is that an agile process trumps a traditional plan-driven software development process every time and in every context – no exceptions.

No Exceptions

On the other hand, the message I hear from traditionalists is… well, uh, I don’t hear much from traditionalists anymore because they’ve been beaten into silence by the hordes of unthinking zombies unleashed upon them by the agilista overlords.

agile zombies

Regarding the “betterness” of #agile over #traditional (or #noestimates over #estimates, or #noprojects over #projects), please leave your handful of personal anecdotes at home. Charismatic “I’ve seen” and “in my (vast) experience” stories don’t comprise science and aren’t sufficient justifications for sweeping generalizations. The science simply doesn’t exist – especially for the construction of large, distributed software systems.

I suppose that if a plausible (and thus, falsifiable) theory of software development processes was to be methodically derived from first principles and rigorously tested via a series of repeatable experiments, the general result would end up looking something like this:

Agile Vs Traditional

What predictive capabilities do you think a credible theory of software development processes would generate? Show Me Your Curves.

Rollercoaster

November 17, 2014 Leave a comment

Wanna go on a wildly fun rollercoaster ride? Then watch Erik Meijer’s “One Hacker Way” rant. Right out of the gate, I guesstimate that he alienated at least half of his audience with his opening “if you haven’t checked in code in the last week, what are you doing at a developer’s conference?” question.

I didn’t agree with all of what Erik said (I doubt anyone did), but I give him full credit for sticking his neck out and attacking as many sacred cows as he could: Agile, Scrum, 2 day certification, TDD “waste“, non-hackers, planning poker, the myth of self-organizing teams, etc. Mmmm, sacred cows make the best tasting hamburgers.

Uncle Bob Martin, the self-smug pope who arrogantly proclaimed “If you don’t do TDD, you’re unprofessional“, tried to make light of Erik’s creative rant with this lame blog post: “One Hacker Way!“. Nice try Bob, but we know you’re seething inside because many of your sacredly held beliefs were put on the stand. You seem to enjoy hacking the sacred cows of the reviled “traditional” way of developing software, but it’s a different story when your own cutlets are at steak.

Mr. Meijer pointed out what I, and no doubt many others, have thought for years: agile, particularly Scrum, is a subtle, insidious form of control. At least with explicit, transparent control, one knows the situation and where one stands. With Scrum, the koolaid-guzzling flock is duped into believing they’re in control; all the while being micro-managed with daily standups, burndown charts, velocity tracking, and cutesy terminology. No wonder it’s amassed huge fame and success – managers love Scrum because it makes their job easier and anesthetizes the coders.

My fave laugh-out-loud moment in Erik’s talk was when he presented Jeff Sutherland as the perceived messiah of software development:

messiah

I’ve found that the best books and talks are those in which I find some of the ideas enlightening and some revolting. Erik Meijer’s talk is certainly one of those brain-busting gems.

The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. – F. Scott Fitzgerald

The #noprograms Revolution

October 16, 2014 Leave a comment

I’ve been developing software in the aerospace and defense industry for 30+ years. Because of the sizes of, and innate System-of-Systems nature of, the solutions in this domain, the processes used to develop them are by necessity, heavyweight. Oh sure, agile/lean techniques can be used effectively in the teeny-tiny-small deep down in the bowels of some of these programs, but to assume “scaling agile” will work in a domain with hundreds of programmers from multiple contractors working on the same distributed system is naive at best, and downright disingenuous at worst.

The most ridiculous examples of inapplicable development practices to the aerospace and defense industry are #noestimates” and “#noprojects“. The “#noprojects” cult is so far off base that they don’t even acknowledge the existence of “programs” – which are a way of organizing a large set of inter-dependent “#noprojects” into, well, a larger grained mission-critical entity worth tens of millions of dollars. It’s like before there were classes and namespaces(packages) added to a programming language to accommodate increasing software system size, there were only “functions” for organizing the structure of a program – and having functions as your only organizing mechanism doesn’t scale well to large software systems.

Hell, the #noprojects people are akin to #noclasses and #nonamespaces people, of which there are thankfully, #nomembers. Really hardcore #noprojects people are perhaps even more loony. They are equivalent to a hypothetical #nofunctionsallowed crowd that demands monolithic, straight-line code only. Line number 1 straight to line number 5,000,000 – and you can’t use loops or “ifs” because they don’t add value and #nofunctionsallowed is all about “maximizing the amount of work not done“.

justcode

But hey, if you don’t need any “projects” to build a successful product from the gecko, then by extrapolation you don’t need any “programs” for organizing your projects. Hence, the inimitable BD00 proposes to “scale up” the “#noprojects” movement. We’ll start a revolutionary #noprograms movement, or equivalently, #justcode . We’ll leapfrog both the #noestimates and #noprojects movements at once. W00t!

noprograms

The Only Approval That Matters

August 25, 2014 Leave a comment

At its core, process agility is all about continuous learning, fast feedback loops, and fluid changeability. Unlike pre-agile methods (and even some currently purported agile methods), which assume that people are forward-marching automatons who “better not make mistakes” and must defend the fort against all external forces of change, process agility accommodates the mental limitations and fallibility of REAL human beings.

Having said that, how agile do you think a process which includes a sign-off list like this is:

Blank Approval

Imagine that whatever has been “approved” by a ceremonial sheet like this is post-facto found to be laced with errors, inconsistencies, and ambiguities due to natural human fallibility. How likely do you think that finders-of-mistakes will publicly point them out, demand a production line stoppage to fix the turds, and suggest that the director-manager-lead approval gauntlet be traversed again? Conversely, how likely do you think that finders-of-mistakes will say “f*ck-it!“, keep their mouths shut, and keep goose-stepping forward with the herd.

fckit

Fear not, dear reader. BD00 has a simple and clean solution to the director-manager-lead approval gauntlet problem. Collapse the list of approvers down to one – the only one that matters:

BD00 Approval

Please submit your plans for BD00 approval in the comments section. As his executive assistant, I can assure you that his stamp/no-stamp decision will be made pronto. However, don’t call us. We’ll call you.

Induce, Deduce, Reflect

August 20, 2014 Leave a comment

Induction is the process of synthesizing a generalization from a set of particulars; a mental step up in abstraction from many-to-one.

Induction

 

Deduction is the process of decomposing one generalization into a set of particulars; a mental step down in abstraction from one to many.

Deduction

A good personal software design process requires iterative execution of both types of sub-processes; with liberal doses of random reflection thrown into the timeline just to muck things up enough so that you can never fully retrace your steps. It’s pure alchemy!

butdreflect

Old School, But Still Relevant

August 14, 2014 Leave a comment

“A distributed system is one in which the failure of a computer you didn’t even know existed can render your own computer unusable.” – Leslie Lamport

I’ve always loved that quote. But that’s only one reason why I was overjoyed when I stumbled upon this article written by Turing award winner Leslie Lamport: “Why We Should Build Software Like We Build Houses”. The other reason is that what he wrote is old school, but still relevant in many contexts:

Most programmers regard anything that doesn’t generate code to be a waste of time. Thinking doesn’t generate code, and writing code without thinking is a recipe for bad code. Before we start to write any piece of code, we should understand what that code is supposed to do. Understanding requires thinking, and thinking is hard.  – Leslie Lamport

I recently modified some code I hadn’t written to add one tiny feature to a program. Doing that required understanding an interface. It took me over a day with a debugger to find out what I needed to know about the interface — something that would have taken five minutes with a spec. To avoid introducing bugs, I had to understand the consequences of every change I made. The absence of specs made that extremely difficult. Not wanting to find and read thousands of lines of code that might be affected, I spent days figuring out how to change as little of the existing code as possible. In the end, it took me over a week to add or modify 180 lines of code. And this was for a very minor change to the program. – Leslie Lamport

New age software gurus and hard-core agilistas have always condescendingly trashed the “building a house” and “building a bridge” metaphors for software development. The reasoning is that houses and bridges are made of  hard-to-reconfigure atoms, whilst software is forged from simple-to-reconfigure bits. Well, yeah, that’s true, but… size matters.

In small systems, if you discover you made a big mistake three quarters of the way through the project, you can rewrite the whole shebang in short order without having to bend metal or cut wood. But as software systems get larger, at some point the “rewrite-from-scratch” strategy breaks down – and often spectacularly. Without house-like blueprints or bridge-like schema to consult, finding and reasoning about and fixing mistakes can be close to impossible – regardless of which state-of-the-art process you’re using.

rebuild

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