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Posts Tagged ‘software development’

The Apples To Apples Fallacy

April 19, 2015 1 comment

To promote their infallible expertise, fathead consultants love to present apples-to-oranges comparisons as though they were apples-to-apples comparisons. One such prominent consultant (hint: a famous Forbes columnist) recently gushed over the success of music provider Spotify.com; contrasting its success to the team that built the buggy, slow, initial, version of the healthcare.gov web site.

As is almost always the case, these clever dudes leave out the oft-hidden, process-independent, contextual, forces that relentlessly work against success:

Apples Oranges

To imply that the Healthcare.gov team would have been successful if they simply employed agile practices (like Spotify.com) is to either be naive, disingenuous, or both.

Have you noticed that the press isn’t clamoring over the inadequacy of the healthcare.gov site anymore? Obviously, the development team must have righted the ship by morphing into a high performing juggernaut under the tutelage of a cadre of agile process consultant(s) – regardless of whether they did or they didn’t.

Both Inane And Insane

April 7, 2015 6 comments

Let’s start this post off by setting some context. What I’m about to spout concerns the development of large, complex, software systems – not mobile apps or personal web sites. So, let’s rock!

The UML class diagram below depicts a taxonomy of methods for representing and communicating system requirements.

Reqs Taxonomy

On the left side of the diagram, we have the traditional methods: expressing requirements as system capabilities/functions/”shalls”. On the right side of the diagram, we have the relatively newer artifacts: use cases and user stories.

When recording requirements for a system you’re going to attempt to build, you can choose a combination of methods as you (or your process police) see fit. In the agile world, the preferred method (as evidenced by 100% of the literature) is to exclusively employ fine-grained user stories – classifying all the other, more abstract, overarching, methods as YAGNI or BRUF.

As the following enhanced diagram shows, whichever method you choose to predominantly start recording and communicating requirements to yourself and others, at least some of the artifacts will be inter-coupled. For example, if you choose to start specifying your system as a set of logically cohesive capabilities, then those capabilities will be coupled to some extent – regardless of whether you consciously try to discover and expose those dependencies or not. After all, an operational system is a collection of interacting parts – not a bag of independent parts.

Reqs Associations

Let’s further enhance our class diagram to progressively connect the levels of granularity as follows:

Reqs Granularity

If you start specifying your system as a set of coarse-grained, interacting capabilities, it may be difficult to translate those capabilities directly into code components, packages, and/or classes. Thus, you may want to close the requirements-to-code intellectual gap by thoughtfully decomposing each capability into a set of logically cohesive, but loosely coupled, functions. If that doesn’t bridge the gap to your liking, then you may choose to decompose each function further into a finer set of logically cohesive, but loosely coupled, “shall” statements. The tradeoff is time upfront for time out back:

  • Capabilities -> Source Code
  • Use Cases – > Source Code
  • Capabilities -> Functions -> Source Code
  • Use Case -> User Story -> Source Code
  • Capabilities -> Functions -> “Shalls” -> Source Code

Note that, taken literally, the last bullet implies that you don’t start writing ANY code until you’ve completed the full, two step, capabilities-to-“shalls” decomposition. Well, that’s a croc o’ crap. You can, and should, start writing code as soon as you understand a capability and/or function well enough so that you can confidently cut at least some skeletal code. Any process that prohibits writing a single line of code until all the i’s are dotted and all the t’s are crossed and five “approval” signatures are secured is, as everyone (not just the agile community) knows, both inane and insane.

No Source Code

Of course, simple projects don’t need no stinkin’ multi-step progression toward source code. They can bypass the Capability, Function, and Use Case levels of abstraction entirely and employ only fine grained “shalls” or User Stories as the method of specification.

One Step To Source Code

On the simplest of projects, you can even go directly from thoughts in your head to code:

Thoughts To Source Code

The purpose of this post is to assert that there is no one and only “right” path in moving from requirements to code. The “heaviness” of the path you decide to take should match the size, criticality, and complexity of the system you’ll be building. The more the mismatch, the more the waste of time and effort.

Planet Agile

March 16, 2015 1 comment

Because methodologists need an “enemy” to make their pet process look good, Agilistas use Traditional methods as their whipping boy. In this post, I’m gonna turn the tables by arguing as a Traditionalista (yet again) and using the exalted Agile methodology as my whipping boy. First, let’s start with two legends:

Legends

Requirements And User Stories

As you can see, the Agile legend is much simpler than the Traditional legend. On planet Agile, there aren’t any formal requirements artifacts that specify system capabilities, application functions, subsystems, inter-subsystem interfaces/interactions, components, or inter-component interfaces/interactions. There are only lightweight, independent, orthogonal, bite-sized “user stories“. Conformant Agile citizens either pooh-pooh away any inter-feature couplings or they simply ignore them, assuming they will resolve themselves during construction via the magical process of “emergence“.

Infrastructure Code And Feature Code

Unlike in the traditional world, in the Agile world there is no distinction between application-specific Infrastructure Code and Feature Code. Hell, it’s all feature code on planet Agile. Infrastructure Code is assumed as a given. However, since developers (and not external product users) write and use infrastructure code, utilizing “User Stories” to specify infrastructure code doesn’t cut it. Perhaps the Agilencia should rethink how they recommend capturing requirements and define two types of “stories“:  “End User Stories” and “Infrastructure User Stories“.

Product Models

 

Non-Existent Design

Regarding the process of “Design“, on planet Agile, thanks to TDD, the code is the design and the design is the code. There is no need to conceptually partition the code (which is THE one and only important artifact on planet Agile) beforehand into easily digestible, visually inspect-able, critique-able, levels of abstraction. To do so would be to steal precious coding time and introduce “waste” into the process. With the exception of the short, bookend events in a sprint (the planning & review/retrospective events), all non-coding activities are “valueless” in the mind of citizen Agile.

Traditional-Agile Map

No Front End

When asked about “What happens before sprint 0?”, one agile expert told me on Twitter that “agile only covers software development activities“.

Sprint-1

As the process timeline template below shows, there is no Sprint -1, otherwise known as “the Front End phase“, on planet Agile. Since the Agile leadership doesn’t recognize infrastructure code, or the separation of design from code, and no feature code is produced during its execution, there is no need for any investment in any Front End work. But hey, as you can plainly see, deliveries start popping out of an Agile process way before a Traditional process. In the specific example below, the nimble Agile team has popped out 4 deliveries of working software before the sluggish Traditional team has even hatched its first iteration. It’s just like planet Agile’s supreme leader asserts in his latest book – a 4X productivity improvement (twice the work in half the time).

Trad Agile Timelines

Process Scalability

The flexible, dare I say “agile“, aspect of the Traditional development template is that it scales down. If the software system to be developed is small enough, or it’s an existing system that simply needs new features added to it, the “Front End” phase can indeed be entirely skipped. If so, then voila, the traditional development template reduces to a parallel series of incremental, evolutionary, sprints – just like the planet Agile template – except for the fact that infrastructure code development and integration testing are shown as first class citizens in the Traditional template.

Scaled Down Traditional

On the other hand, the planet Agile template does not scale up. Since there is no such concept as a “Front End” phase on planet Agile, as a bona fide Agilista, you wouldn’t dare to plan and execute that phase even if you intuited that it would reduce long term development and maintenance costs for: you, your current and future fellow developers, and your company. To hell with the future. Damn it, your place on planet Agile is to get working software out the door as soon as possible. To do otherwise would be to put a target on your back and invite the wrath of the planet Agile politburo.

The Big Distortion

When comparing Agile with Traditional methods, the leadership on planet Agile always simplifies and distorts the Traditional development process. It is presented as a rigid, inflexible monster to be slain:

Big Bang

In the mind of citizen Agile, simply mentioning the word “Traditional” conjures up scary images of Niagara Falls, endless BRUF (Big Requirements Up Front), BDUF (Big Design Up Front), Big Bang Integration (BBI), and late, or non-existent, deliveries of working software. Of course, as the citizenry on planet Agile (and planet Traditional) knows, many Traditional endeavors have indeed resulted in failed outcomes. But for an Agile citizen to acknowledge Agile failures, let alone attribute some of those failures to the lack of performing any Front End due diligence, is to violate the Agile constitution and again place herself under the watchful eye of the Agile certification bureaucracy.

The Most Important Question

You may be wondering, since I’ve taken on the role of an unapologetic Traditionalista in this post, if I am an “Agile-hater” intent on eradicating planet Agile from the universe. No, I’m not. I try my best to not be an Absolutist about anything. Both planet Agile and planet Traditional deserve their places in the universe.

Perhaps the first, and most important, question to ask on each new software development endeavor is: “Do we need any Front End work, and if so, how much do we need?

 

Where Specialists, Dependencies, And Handoffs Are Required

February 23, 2015 Leave a comment

Take a minute to look around yourself and imagine how many interdependent chains of specialists and handoffs were required to produce the materials that make your life quite a bit more comfortable than our cave dwelling ancestors.

Specialists

Total self sufficiency is a great concept, but if you had to do all the work to produce all of the things you take for granted, you wouldn’t be able to. You simply wouldn’t have enough time.

In software development, above a certain (unknown) level of complexity and size, specialists, dependencies, and handoffs are required to have any chance of getting the work done and the product integrated. Cross-functional teams, where every single person on the team knows how to design and code every functional area of a product, is an unrealistic pipe dream for anything but trivial products.

Battling The Confirmation Bias

January 21, 2015 6 comments

On my first pass through Bertrand Meyer’s “Agile!” book, I interpreted its contents as a well-reasoned diatribe against agilism (yes, “agile” has become so big that it warrants being called an “ism” now). Because I was eager to do so, I ignored virtually all the positive points Mr. Meyer made and fully embraced his negative points. My initial reading was a classic case of the “confirmation bias“; where one absorbs all the evidence aligning with one’s existing beliefs and jettisons any evidence to the contrary. I knew that the confirmation bias would kick in before I started reading the book – and I looked forward to scratching that ego-inflating itch.

On my second pass through the book, I purposely skimmed over the negatives and concentrated on the positives. Here is Mr. Meyer’s list of positive ideas and practices that “agile” has either contributed to, or (mostly) re-prioritized for, the software development industry:

  • The central role of production code over all else
  • Tests and regression test suites as first class citizens
  • Short, time-boxed iterations
  • Daily standup meetings
  • The importance of accommodating change
  • Continuous integration
  • Velocity tracking & task boards

I should probably end this post here and thank the agile movement for refocusing the software development industry on what’s really important… but I won’t :)

The best and edgiest writing in the book, which crisply separates it from its toned down (but still very good) peer, Boehm and Turner’s “Balancing Agility And Discipline“, is the way Mr. Meyer gives the agilencia a dose of its own medicine. Much like some of the brightest agile luminaries (e.g. Sutherland, Cohn, Beck, Jeffries, Larman, Cockburn, Poppendieck, Derby, Denning (sic)) relish villainizing any and all traditional technical and management practices in use before the rise of agilism, Mr. Meyer convincingly points out the considerable downsides of some of agile’s most cherished ideas:

  • User stories as the sole means of capturing requirements (too fine grained; miss the forest for the trees)
  • Pair programming and open offices (ignores individual preferences, needs, personalities)
  • Rejection of all upfront requirements and design activities (for complex systems, can lead to brittle, inextensible, dead-end products)
  • Feature-based development and ignorance of (inter-feature) dependencies (see previous bullet)
  • Test Driven Development (myopic, sequential test-by-test focus can lead to painting oneself into a corner).
  • Coach as a separate role (A ploy to accommodate the burgeoning agile consulting industry. Need more doer roles, not talkers.)
  • Embedded customer (There is no one, single, customer voice on non-trivial projects. It’s impractical and naive to think there is one.)
  • Deprecation of documents (no structured repository of shared understanding to go to seek clarification on system level requirements/architecture/design issues; high maintenance costs for long-lived systems; costly on-boarding of new developers)

I’ve always maintained that there is much to like about the various agile approaches, but the way the agile big-wigs have been morphing the movement into a binary “do-this/don’t-do-that” religious dogma, and trashing anything not considered “agile“, is a huge turnoff to me. How about you?

Obscured By Hype

Three Forms Of Evaluation

December 17, 2014 Leave a comment

When creating an architecture or detailed design of a system component, up to three forms of design evaluation can be performed:

  • A: Continuous evaluation by the designer during the process
  • B: Evaluation by a peer group at one or more review events during the process
  • C: Evaluation by an expert outsider group after A and B

These three forms of evaluation are illustrated in the sequence of diagrams below. Note that as each evaluation type is progressively added to the mix, a new feedback loop is introduced into the system.

During A, the conceive/evaluate/repair loop is performed at the speed of thought within the isolated mind of the designer. As the designer applies his skills to his understanding of the problem to be solved, alternative component structures and configurations can pop up instantaneously during each of many high frequency loop traversals. At some point, the designer concludes that his design solution is stable enough for external scrutiny and/or ready for the next step of realization.

Designer Eval

During B, the designer walks through his creation in front of a group of peers. He explains the structure and behavior mechanisms of his design and how it solves the problem. If the peer group is qualified, prepared, and objective (QPO), at least a portion of the feedback the group produces will be valuable to the designer and he will use it to improve his design. However, unless all three QPO pre-conditions are satisfied, the peer review process will be a huge waste of time and money.

Peer Eval

Jetting in an expert outsider group is the riskiest type of evaluation. Assuming that the QPO criteria is satisfied, the fact that the expert outsider group has no real “skin in the game” after it vacates the premises should be a cause for concern to anyone contemplating the use of the technique.

Expert Eval

In general, the more negative feedback loops incorporated into a process, the more likely the process is to produce its intended output. As the final figure above implies, incorporating all three types of evaluation into a design review process can lead to a high quality design. However, blindly ignoring the QPO criteria and/or failing to address the “skin in the game” risk can increase cost, lengthen schedule, and lay waste to your well-intentioned review process – without you ever knowing that it occurred. As ever, the devil is in the details.

Show Me Your Curves

December 14, 2014 7 comments

Either directly or subliminally, the message I hear from hardcore agilista big-wigs is that an agile process trumps a traditional plan-driven software development process every time and in every context – no exceptions.

No Exceptions

On the other hand, the message I hear from traditionalists is… well, uh, I don’t hear much from traditionalists anymore because they’ve been beaten into silence by the hordes of unthinking zombies unleashed upon them by the agilista overlords.

agile zombies

Regarding the “betterness” of #agile over #traditional (or #noestimates over #estimates, or #noprojects over #projects), please leave your handful of personal anecdotes at home. Charismatic “I’ve seen” and “in my (vast) experience” stories don’t comprise science and aren’t sufficient justifications for sweeping generalizations. The science simply doesn’t exist – especially for the construction of large, distributed software systems.

I suppose that if a plausible (and thus, falsifiable) theory of software development processes was to be methodically derived from first principles and rigorously tested via a series of repeatable experiments, the general result would end up looking something like this:

Agile Vs Traditional

What predictive capabilities do you think a credible theory of software development processes would generate? Show Me Your Curves.

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