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OMG! Design By Committee

In Federico Biancuzzi’s terrific “Masterminds Of Programming“, Federico interviews the three Amigo co-creators of UML. In discussing the “advancement” of the UML after the Amigos freely donated their work to the OMG for further development, Jim Rumbaugh had this to say:

The OMG (Object Management Group) is a case study in how political meddling can damage any good idea. The first version of UML was simple enough, because people didn’t have time to add a lot of clutter. Its main fault was an inconsistent viewpoint—some things were pretty high-level and others were closely aligned to particular programming languages. That’s what the second version should have cleared up. Unfortunately, a lot of people who were jealous of our initial success got involved in the second version. – Jim Rumbaugh

LOL! Following up, Jim landed a second blow:

The OMG process allowed all kinds of special interests to stuff things into UML 2.0, and since the process is mainly based on consensus, it is almost impossible to kill bad ideas. So UML 2.0 became a bloated monstrosity, with far too much dubious content, and still no consistent viewpoint and no way to define one. – Jim Rumbaugh

Double LOL!

Another UML co-creator, Grady Booch, says essentially the same thing but without specifically mentioning the OMG cabal:

UML 2.0 to some degree, and I’ll say this a little bit harshly, suffered a bit of a second system effect in that there were great opportunities and special interest groups, if you will, clamoring for certain specific features which added to the bloat of UML 2.0. – Grady Booch

Triple LOL!

Mitchi Henning, a key player during the CORBA era, rants about the OMG in this controversial “The Rise And Fall Of CORBA” article. Mitchi enraged the corbaholic community by lambasting both CORBA and the dysfunctional OMG politburo that maintains it:

Over the span of a few years, CORBA moved from being a successful middleware that was hailed as the Internet’s next-generation e-commerce infrastructure to being an obscure niche technology that is all but forgotten. This rapid decline is surprising. How can a technology that was produced by the world’s largest software consortium fall from grace so quickly? Many of the reasons are technical: poor architecture, complex APIs, and lack of essential features all contributed to CORBA’s downfall. However, such technical shortcomings are a symptom rather than a cause. Ultimately, CORBA failed because its standardization process virtually guarantees poor technical quality. Seeing that other standards consortia use a process that is very similar, this does not bode well for the viability of other technologies produced in this fashion. – Mitchi Henning

Maybe the kings and queens of the OMG should add an exclamation point to the end of their acronym: OMG!

The reason the OMG! junta interests me is because I’ve been working hands-on with RTI‘s implementation of the OMG Data Distribution Service (DDS) standard to design and build the infrastructure for a distributed sensor data processing server that will be embedded in a safety-critical supersystem. At this point in time, since DDS was co-designed, tested, and fielded by two commercial companies and it wasn’t designed from scratch by a big OMG committee, I think it’s a terrific standard. Particularly, I think RTI’s version is spectacular relative to the other two implementations that I know about. I hope the OMG! doesn’t transform DDS into an abomination………

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  1. December 16, 2010 at 1:11 am
  2. March 2, 2013 at 1:05 am
  3. May 14, 2013 at 1:01 am
  4. September 15, 2013 at 6:47 am

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