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Two Plus Months

Race conditions are one of the worst plagues of concurrent code: They can cause disastrous effects all the way up to undefined behavior and random code execution, yet they’re hard to discover reliably during testing, hard to reproduce when they do occur, and the icing on the cake is that we have immature and inadequate race detection and prevention tool support available today. – Herb Sutter (DrDobbs.com)

With this opening paragraph in mind, observe the figure below. If you don’t lock-protect a stateful object that’s accessed by more than one thread, you’re guaranteed to fall into the dastardly trap that Herb describes. D’oh!

Now, look at the two object figure below. Unless you protect each of the two objects in the execution path with a lock, you’re hosed!

To improve performance at the expense of higher risk, you can use one lock for the two object example like on the left side of this graphic:

Alas, if you do choose to use one lock in a two object configuration like the example above, you better be sure that you don’t come in through the side with another thread to use the thread-unsafe object2. You also better be sure that a future maintainer of your code doesn’t do the same. But wait… How can you ensure that a maintainer won’t do that? You can’t. So stick with the more conservative, lower performance, one-lock-per-object approach.

Don’t ask me why I wrote this post cuz I ain’t answering. Well, Ok, ask. I wrote this post because I was burned by the left-hand side of the second graphic in this post. It took quite awhile, actually two plus months, to finally localize and squash the bugger in production code. As usual, Herb was right.

And please, don’t tell me that lock-free programming is the answer:

…replacing locks wholesale by writing your own lock-free code is not the answer. Lock-free code has two major drawbacks. First, it’s not broadly useful for solving typical problems—lots of basic data structures, even doubly linked lists, still have no known lock-free implementations. Second, it’s hard even for experts. It’s easy to write lock-free code that appears to work, but it’s very difficult to write lock-free code that is correct and performs well. Even good magazines and refereed journals have published a substantial amount of lock-free code that was actually broken in subtle ways and needed correction. – Herb Sutter (Dr. Dobbs).

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  1. September 3, 2012 at 1:03 am

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