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The Trees And The Forest

As a result of an online Twitter exchange with Mr. Jon Quigley, I was able to purchase a copy of his and Kim Pries’s book, “Project Management Of Complex And Embedded Systems“. In exchange for a half-price deal, I promised to blog a review of the book and, thus, this is it.

quigley book

As indicated by the book title, the subject matter is all about the methods and tools commonly used by program/project managers for orchestrating large, capital-intensive, multi-disciplined, product development endeavors. Specifically, the content focuses on how the automotive industry successfully manages the development and production of products composed of thousands of electro-mechanical parts and hundreds of networked processors, some of which run safety-critical software. Even though we tend to take them for granted, when you think about it, an automobile is an extremely complex distributed system requiring lots of coordinated mental, physical, and automated, labor to produce.

The book provides comprehensive, yet introductory, coverage of the myriad of tools and processes used in the world of big project management. It’s more of a broad, sweeping, reference book than a detailed step-by-step prescription for executing a specific set of processes. It’s jam packed with lots of useful lists, figures, tables, and graphs. The end of each chapter even includes a specific “war story” experienced by one or both of the authors over their long careers.

As a long time software developer of complex embedded systems in the aerospace and defense industry, much of the book’s subject matter is familiar to me. RFPs, SOWs, WBSs, EVM, BOMs, V&V, SRRs, PDRs, CDRs, TRRs, FMEA, staged-gate phases, prime-subcontractor relationships, master schedules, multi-level approvals, quality metrics, docu-centric information exchanges, etc, are amongst the methods used to facilitate, focus, constrain, and guide end-to-end system development. Many of the chapter-ending war stories tickled my funny bone too!

For the types of projects Mssrs. Pries and Quigley target in the book, kicking off a project at sprint 0 with a self-organizing team of eight cross-functional developers and a primed product backlog of user stories just doesn’t cut it. So, if you’re a young, naive, cloistered software developer or scrum master or product owner who belittles all “traditional“, rigorous, non-agile processes, I highly recommend this book. It will give you a glimpse into a whole different world and broaden your horizons – perhaps allowing you to see both the trees and the forest.

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